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Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Private sector shot self on foot

NELLY MTEMA in Dodoma
. . . Mpango outlines reasons for government stance on PPP
POOR performance record coupled with a long history of complications by the private sector in some development projects have forced the government to invest and execute its infrastructural ventures.

Responding to a proposal put forward by parliamentarians when debating the 2018 fiscal budget of 32.47trn/- and the proposed National Development Plan in the National Assembly, here yesterday, Finance and Planning Minister, Dr Philip Mpango remarked.
He insisted that the government would continue with prudential borrowing to effect its development projects as the private sector was not applying the ‘friend in need is a friend in deed’ approach.
“It is not that the government does not want to engage the private sector in its development projects; we know it is an engine for the economic growth, but we have bad experience and all of you are witnesses,” said Dr Mpango.
He said the government would keep on borrowing so long as the national debt is stable, to improve the local economy capacity and implement some of the development projects of key interest.
Dr Mpango said the government would use its own resources in the purchase of airplanes, construction of the standard gauge railway (SRG) as well as Stigler’s Gorge electricity project, not forgetting revamping its ailing parastatals.
“You all know what happened until we had to intervene to what the private s e c t o r and inv e s t o r s did to Tanzania Railway Corporation, Tanzania Telecommunication Company and Air Tanzania to mention a few”, he said amid applause from Members of Parliament.
Moreover, he said, the private sector did not come on time when needed and when they do so, they put on the table a complicated offer,thus the government decided to fit in its shoes and run the projects on its own.
He said such challenges brought by the private sector made the government to look into possibilities of running some of its projects, which he said has positive results, citing that in more than a decade, the government is set to get a 1bn/- dividend from TTCL.
Dr Mpango said they value the Public Private Partnership (PPP) and whenever there are opportunities, they will do so based on the merit of the project for national interest.
“We value the private sector, but they should be measured on their willingness and commitment; the government has been there, but the challenges we encountered, made us to think twice,” said Dr Mpango.
He said in the next national development budget, focus will be in the agricultural sector, availability of reliable water and tapping the natural gas resource opportunities, now the focus is on the industrial economy. Dr Mpango said that they would also manage the population as well as improve the economy.
He assured the National Assembly that he would work on their proposal so that when he tables the National Development Plan next year, it will accommodate majority of their opinions.
NASA leader Raila Odinga’s new push for inclusion questionable By Korir Sing’oei | Published Wed, November 15th 2017 at 00:00, Updated November 15th 2017 at 09:07 GMT +3 SHARE THIS ARTICLE Share on Facebook Share on Twitter A key plank of Raila Odinga’s speech at the Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington DC last week was his assertion that, the drive behind his (or by and large NASA/NRM’s) latest campaign is to end exclusion in Kenya. Can Raila Odinga, a billionaire, former Prime Minister, Member of Parliament for several years and son of Kenya’s first vice president, in all candour truly claim that existing mechanisms are insufficient? ALSO READ: NASA leaders visit Kalonzo in Germany David Lake and Donald Rothschild in their highly acclaimed study, The International Spread of Ethnic Conflict Fear, Diffusion, and Escalation (1998) identify four main options for enhancing inclusion in divided societies: 1) demonstration of respect for all groups and their cultures; 2) formal or informal power sharing; 3) elections according to rules that ensure either power sharing or the minimal representation of all ethnic groups in national politics; and 4) federalism or regional autonomy. Arguably, all the above strategies have been applied within the Kenyan context to varying degrees of success. The steps taken Fundamentally, the Constitution is in itself, an instrument for inclusion: the human rights regime recognises entitlements of historically excluded and marginalised groups; while devolution is designed to cure inequality in the long term by decentralising representation (where over 1,450 MCAs have been elected) and service delivery to 47 subnational units. Furthermore, public sector management is designed to adopt inclusive recruitment approaches at both national and county levels. Indeed, the Public Service Commission (and its counterpart, the County Service Boards) is required to ensure proportionate representation of all ethnic communities including the youth. The Public Service (Values and Principles) Act, in appreciation of historically skewed recruitment, enjoins the Public Service Commission to disregard competition in order to ensure recruitment of persons from “an ethnic group [that] is disproportionately represented in the public service or in a public institution.” On the other hand, the main political formations, NASA and Jubilee, also have as their focus, the goal of enhancing inclusion. In fact, any serious examination of these parties’ policy intentions on social inclusion will reveal no significant variance between them. Both NASA and Jubilee proposed to attack social exclusion through targeted pragmatic approaches through strengthening of devolution as well as inter-governmental collaboration between the two levels of government. The ODM manifesto 2013-2017 professed that ODM will “promote diversity and inclusion of all Kenya people and communities and counties through zero tolerance to negative ethnicity and ensuring equity in access to resources and productive opportunities, positions and instruments of power“. ALSO READ: Uhuru lawyers engage petitioners in heated argument over court documents The NASA manifesto, 2017 emphasises nation-building on the foundation of national reconciliation and resolution of historical injustices, but does not provide specific underpinnings to guide delivery of these imperatives. Jubilee’s social inclusion menu, whose scaling up was proposed by its 2017 manifesto, is not less impressive. Over the past five years, Government reports indicate that Sh42.8 billion has been awarded to youth, women and persons with disabilities through the 30 per cent Access to Government Procurement Opportunities (AGPO). Expansion of social safety net targeting orphans and vulnerable children, older persons and persons with severe disabilities has increased to 700,000 in 5 years, up from about 250,000 beneficiaries. Communal grievances In terms of specific redress for communal grievances, the Government has since recognised the Nubians and Makonde and Asians as Kenyan citizens, and granted Nubians 288 acres of land in Kibra. Moreover, there is no empirical evidence that access to social services and infrastructure during Mr Kenyatta’s first term was in any way discriminatory of some regions. While statistics on ethnic shares of social service access are limited, sectoral examples can be cited in support of the proposition that President Kenyatta’s government has indeed pursued a more inclusive developmental approach. For instance, the 1.2 million homes connected to electricity over the last 5 years has no doubt benefitted every corner of the country. Certainly, over this period, the number of new connectivity in Siaya County doubled those in Muranga. Similarly, the regional spread of over 3,000km of new tarmac roads, demonstrates that deliberate attempts have been made to ensure that many more Kenyans benefit from improved road network. ALSO READ: 80 per cent of Kenyans say country headed in the wrong direction – survey To Mr Odinga, exclusion is just his latest catchphrase. That he understands a great deal about the struggle for naked political power having fought for it on the ballot and in the streets is indisputable. However, his credentials in the struggle against social-economic marginalisation remain highly doubtful. Dr Sing’Oei is an Advocate of the High Court of Kenya and a Legal Advisor, Executive office of the Deputy President
Read more at: https://www.standardmedia.co.ke/article/2001260238/nasa-leader-raila-odinga-s-new-push-for-inclusion-questionable
NASA leader Raila Odinga’s new push for inclusion questionable By Korir Sing’oei | Published Wed, November 15th 2017 at 00:00, Updated November 15th 2017 at 09:07 GMT +3 SHARE THIS ARTICLE Share on Facebook Share on Twitter A key plank of Raila Odinga’s speech at the Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington DC last week was his assertion that, the drive behind his (or by and large NASA/NRM’s) latest campaign is to end exclusion in Kenya. Can Raila Odinga, a billionaire, former Prime Minister, Member of Parliament for several years and son of Kenya’s first vice president, in all candour truly claim that existing mechanisms are insufficient? ALSO READ: NASA leaders visit Kalonzo in Germany David Lake and Donald Rothschild in their highly acclaimed study, The International Spread of Ethnic Conflict Fear, Diffusion, and Escalation (1998) identify four main options for enhancing inclusion in divided societies: 1) demonstration of respect for all groups and their cultures; 2) formal or informal power sharing; 3) elections according to rules that ensure either power sharing or the minimal representation of all ethnic groups in national politics; and 4) federalism or regional autonomy. Arguably, all the above strategies have been applied within the Kenyan context to varying degrees of success. The steps taken Fundamentally, the Constitution is in itself, an instrument for inclusion: the human rights regime recognises entitlements of historically excluded and marginalised groups; while devolution is designed to cure inequality in the long term by decentralising representation (where over 1,450 MCAs have been elected) and service delivery to 47 subnational units. Furthermore, public sector management is designed to adopt inclusive recruitment approaches at both national and county levels. Indeed, the Public Service Commission (and its counterpart, the County Service Boards) is required to ensure proportionate representation of all ethnic communities including the youth. The Public Service (Values and Principles) Act, in appreciation of historically skewed recruitment, enjoins the Public Service Commission to disregard competition in order to ensure recruitment of persons from “an ethnic group [that] is disproportionately represented in the public service or in a public institution.” On the other hand, the main political formations, NASA and Jubilee, also have as their focus, the goal of enhancing inclusion. In fact, any serious examination of these parties’ policy intentions on social inclusion will reveal no significant variance between them. Both NASA and Jubilee proposed to attack social exclusion through targeted pragmatic approaches through strengthening of devolution as well as inter-governmental collaboration between the two levels of government. The ODM manifesto 2013-2017 professed that ODM will “promote diversity and inclusion of all Kenya people and communities and counties through zero tolerance to negative ethnicity and ensuring equity in access to resources and productive opportunities, positions and instruments of power“. ALSO READ: Uhuru lawyers engage petitioners in heated argument over court documents The NASA manifesto, 2017 emphasises nation-building on the foundation of national reconciliation and resolution of historical injustices, but does not provide specific underpinnings to guide delivery of these imperatives. Jubilee’s social inclusion menu, whose scaling up was proposed by its 2017 manifesto, is not less impressive. Over the past five years, Government reports indicate that Sh42.8 billion has been awarded to youth, women and persons with disabilities through the 30 per cent Access to Government Procurement Opportunities (AGPO). Expansion of social safety net targeting orphans and vulnerable children, older persons and persons with severe disabilities has increased to 700,000 in 5 years, up from about 250,000 beneficiaries. Communal grievances In terms of specific redress for communal grievances, the Government has since recognised the Nubians and Makonde and Asians as Kenyan citizens, and granted Nubians 288 acres of land in Kibra. Moreover, there is no empirical evidence that access to social services and infrastructure during Mr Kenyatta’s first term was in any way discriminatory of some regions. While statistics on ethnic shares of social service access are limited, sectoral examples can be cited in support of the proposition that President Kenyatta’s government has indeed pursued a more inclusive developmental approach. For instance, the 1.2 million homes connected to electricity over the last 5 years has no doubt benefitted every corner of the country. Certainly, over this period, the number of new connectivity in Siaya County doubled those in Muranga. Similarly, the regional spread of over 3,000km of new tarmac roads, demonstrates that deliberate attempts have been made to ensure that many more Kenyans benefit from improved road network. ALSO READ: 80 per cent of Kenyans say country headed in the wrong direction – survey To Mr Odinga, exclusion is just his latest catchphrase. That he understands a great deal about the struggle for naked political power having fought for it on the ballot and in the streets is indisputable. However, his credentials in the struggle against social-economic marginalisation remain highly doubtful. Dr Sing’Oei is an Advocate of the High Court of Kenya and a Legal Advisor, Executive office of the Deputy President
Read more at: https://www.standardmedia.co.ke/article/2001260238/nasa-leader-raila-odinga-s-new-push-for-inclusion-questionable

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